No matter who you are, or where you are on life's journey, you are welcome here at University Congregational United Church of Christ. Young, old, sure of your path, or still searching --- we invite you to join us in imagining love and justice - as Jesus did - in acting to change the world.

Right now, during the pandemic, we are still united as church. Our service is streamed on YouTube and Facebook. You will find the links just below this section on our home page. New services are offered weekly at 10 am on Sundays, and are available on line after that.

We strive to walk in the path of Jesus, and to offer an authentic welcome to everyone who walks through our door. If you are new to us, we would love to get to know you and answer your questions about our church, even though we cannot greet you in person. A member of our Welcome Committee, or a pastor, would be happy to correspond on email or talk with you on the phone. Click here to arrange for a "meeting." 

Our worship service starts at 10 am and includes hymns, prayers, scripture reading and a sermon. It usually lasts about an hour. Right now we are worshiping online and will adjust this message once we are able to meet together in our sanctuary once again.  More information here.

Children are an important part of our community, and are welcome for all or part or the service.

UCUCC Parking Map

View for detailed Google Map.

Parking can be a challenge in the University District! Persistence, patience and an early start are keys to success.

UW has free parking on Sundays. Enter the main campus gate at NE 45th and 17th Ave NE and turn left past the toll booth. It's about a three-block walk to the church. The UW Meany Garage at 15th Ave. NE and NE 41st St. is a five-block walk.

The church also owns three parking lots - Lot A is across the street from the church on 16th Ave. E. Lot B is beneath Sortun Court, just north of the church on the east side of 16th Ave. E. (It closes at 2 p.m.) Lot C (for those with difficulty walking, young children and visitors) is at the corner of 15th NE and NE 45th St., next to the church.

If you need to be assured of a close parking spot, you can call the church office before noon on Friday to reserve one: 206-524-2322.

During this pandemic, we have discontinued our in-person lunches. We would love to meet with you via email or phone, however. Click here to arrange a meeting with a Welcome Committee Volunteer or pastor.

We can explore and explain a range of topics about our church, from history, to theology, to membership. Please contact us at the link above for more information.

We are an inter-generational church and strive to be family-friendly, with an active ministry for children and youth. All ages are welcome in worship. We also offer nursery and child-care, Younger children begin the service with us and usually leave after about 15 minutes. Older children have the option of leaving for a special sermon time. Junior high and high school youth meet at 9 am and then often sit together in worship. Give us a call at 206-524-2322 for more specifics.

Our programs for children and youth continue during this pandemic. Sign up at the bottom of the home page to receive our Children's Ministries and/or Youth Ministries newsletter.

Hearing Impaired: Our sanctuary has an induction loop system that uses the T-Coil mode of your hearing aids. You can get the necessary equipment just before entering the Sanctuary on the right or ask any usher.

Visually Impaired: We offer each Sunday's program in large print for easier readability.

Wheelchair Access: The front entry is wheelchair accessible as are the rest rooms. Please don't hesitate to ask for assistance.

Beloved Community,

On Sunday, July 4th, our nation will celebrate Independence Day. In recognition, our church office will be closed on July 5th.

How a church recognizes, honors, or celebrates a national holiday is not a simple matter. This is certainly true for July 4th. Our nation’s Declaration of Independence was a document that proclaimed that “all men are created equal.”  And yet that very document and declaration ignored the deep injustices that were already embedded in the community declaring “independence.”

One good exploration of those contradictions is Frederick Douglas’ 1853 speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July?”  If you have not read the entire speech, we encourage you to do so. Last summer, Douglas’ descendants recorded it here.

Here is an excerpt:
I answer: a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciation of tyrants, brass-fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade and solemnity, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy-a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation . . .

These words continue to resonate in what Inaugural Poet Amanda Gorman last January called our “unfinished” nation. (And this weekend might be a good time to reread or rewatch her poem, “The Hill We Climb,” again.)

As followers of Jesus we recognize our allegiance is to a kin-dom for which we pray, beyond any national allegiance. Our Christian story was born in resistance to any co-opting of faith by empire. In fact, throughout history the merging of nationalism and religion has proven oppressive and deadly. To imagine that true religion stands on the side of any state is a dangerous misunderstanding of spirituality.

So this weekend, as we observe the 4th of July, may we as citizens and residents respond to Gorman’s call:

“We will rebuild, reconcile, and recover in every known nook of our nation and every corner called our country, our people diverse and beautiful will emerge, battered and beautiful.
When day comes we step out of the shade, aflame and unafraid.
The new dawn blooms as we free it.
For there is always light,
if only we’re brave enough to see it,
if only we’re brave enough to be it.”

And may we as people of faith, citizens and residents of God’s kin-dim, continue the universal spiritual work of justice and peace.

Blessings,
Catherine Foote
Steve Jerbi

Pastor Amy is currently on vacation and will return July 6

Here is how to reach us: 
Catherine, cfoote@universityucc.org (206) 321-7604
Amy, aroon@universityucc.org (206) 605-6893
Steve, sjerbi@universityucc.org (414) 238-7030